General Information about the conference

TEACHING ARTISTIC RESEARCH

Scientific Committee:
Henrik Benesch, David Campbell, Jennifer de Felice, Adrian Friend, Barbara Graf, Katharina Gsöllpointner, Michael Hann, Liesbeth Huybrechts, Margarete
Jahrmann, Richard Jochum, Anja Jonkhans, Gabriele Jutz, Christoph Kaltenbrunner, Fares Kayali, Barbara Putz Plecko, Ingeborg Reichle, Elisabeth Schäfer, Martin Vácha, Veerle Van der Sluys, Stefan Wykydal.

With art as research becoming an established paradigm in art education, several questions arise. How do we educate young artists to actively engage in the production of knowledge and aesthetic experiences in an expanded field? What are some of the role models that we can look to when we speak about hybrid practices and artistic research? How do we best prepare students to carry out their own artistic research? What can we allow in the curriculum to accommodate a changed learning, making, and research landscape? And how is teaching “art” different from teaching “artistic research”? What particular abilities and competencies should a teacher of artistic research have?

 

The conference sought contributions that respond to these questions through a variety of short presentations, theoretical reflections, analyses, case studies, performative lectures, hands-on workshops and poster presentations. We invite practitioners and theoreticians from the fields of artistic research and arts/design to share their perspectives, expertise, and knowledge. The conference, which will take place in Vienna, is being organized jointly by the University of Applied Arts Vienna and Teachers College, Columbia University in New York. The organizer goal was to create a supportive space for open, lively, and inclusive discussion.

Session #1:

ROLE MODELS

Given the wealth of possible approaches
to artistic research, each of us may look
to a different role model when defining
art practice as research. What type of
role models can we identify? Why do
these succeed? This session aims to
ground the conversation in examples
of existing practices that are successful
and distinct

Session #2:

HYBRIDITY IN MAKING:
RETHINKING THE CURRICULUM

What do students need to know in
order to engage in meaningful artistic
research? Given that artistic research
takes place in an expanded field, and
is often socially engaged, hybrid and
contextual, what revisions should we
make to the current curriculum? How
do we best prepare students to carry
out their own artistic research? And
how is teaching “art” and “design”
different from teaching “artistic
research”? Is there a difference between
art/design practice and artistic research
practice? If yes, what is that difference?

Session #3:

HYBRID PEDAGOGIES: TEACHING
FOR INTERDISCIPLINARITY

How do art schools best educate
students to engage with artistic
research? Is a broad interdisciplinary
background (in fields such as sociology,
anthropology, psychology, philosophy,
art history, ecology, crafts techniques)
beneficial when teaching this type
of research? What particular abilities
and competencies should a teacher
of artistic research have? How does a
teacher encourage engagement
with ideas beyond a market-driven
traditional art career? What role do
wonder, curiosity, and aesthetic experience play in this type of research?

Group presentation and Solo Presentation

2x PRESENTATIONS SESSION  #3 HYBRID PEDAGOGIES:
TEACHING FOR INTERDISCIPLINARITY

@11:30 AM & @3:30 PM

 

Every paper was double-blind peer-reviewed by one artist and one scientist of an international and multidisciplinary Scientific Committee.

CO-DESIGNING FOR INCLUSION IN
INTERNATIONAL/INTERDISCIPLINARY TEAMS

AUTHORS: R.DEZSÖ, L. LUKÁCS, R. MATEUS-BERR, G. URRUTIA REYES, J. ROSOKLIJA, Stefan TRIMMEL
University of Applied Arts Vienna (AUT)
Moholy-Nagy University of Art and Design (HUN)

The vision for the future of work will be that artists and designers will be integrated in the design process, asking unexpected questions as members of interdisciplinary teams, and further fostering innovation. Too, artistic research will investigate the fields of science with their unique approaches. Divergent thinking will synchronize fragmented work. The objective of this article is to analyze the value of knowledge-sharing among interdisciplinary and international teams —17 students of social design and teacher education from Austria, and design students from Hungary—in order to collaborate with inclusive schools and co-design in interdisciplinary and international teams by developing individualized design tools for children with special needs. The methods used were “research through design (artefact and research), practice-based” and “design thinking.” In August 2014 the European Commission introduced the notion “education that suits.” Since then, all schools have a duty of care: they are responsible for placing every child, including those with special educational needs, in a suitable educational setting, preferably in mainstream education.
“Inclusion” here differs from “social inclusion,” which connotes children with diverse migrant and social backgrounds, as opposed to children with (multiple) disabilities. This strategy requires changes in education within the art and design subjects and societal changes of engagement in general according to Victor Papaneks, in his “Desire of a Soc(iet)al Turn” (in “Design for the Real World, Human Ecology and Social Change: Design of Teaching and Learning Media for People with Disabilities”). This paper explores the engagement with children with multiple disabilities and designing things for them in order to develop empathic and inter/transdisciplinary skills. The paper explores a practice-based approach in design and responds to the criticism of Friedmann (2008) in the form of researching the practice of students by observation, self-reflection, documentation and interviews.

KEYWORDS co-design, interdisciplinary, international, special needs, inclusion, research through design, practice-based

DISSEMINATION PRACTICE IN UNIVERSITY EDUCATION WITH THE AIM OF CO-ABILITY

AUTHOR: Renata DEZSÖ
Moholy-Nagy University of Art and Design (HUN)

The presentation explores philosophical and strategic approaches to life-changing materials for our students in artistic research. In 2017, we launched a series of university courses with a theoretical basis in Critical Disability Studies and Design Research. “The continual challenge from disabilities has forced design science into the position of leading innovation”(Laurillard, 2008). As a teacher and artistic researcher, I have sought to unite principled and reflective design practices with the aim of helping shape a genuine co-ability approach that will be valuable in a diverse range of educational environments. During these courses, the relation with disabilities was determined by the Csillagház Primary School, which operates in Budapest and educates children with life-limiting and life-threatening impairments. The program series contained a semester-long course, intensive workshop as a unit of design experimentation, and a knowledge-sharing exchange program with the University of Applied Arts Vienna. The
program began with disability awareness and sensitization training (utilizing knowing-in-action methods), integrated theoretical studies, and other onsite programs. The experience made us rethink how we use words such as “valued,” “quality,” “life” and “living.” By using the critical approach of post-human disability studies the focus has switched to a repertoire of experiencing reciprocal connectivity, using design research tools that exceed individual-centered norms.

KEYWORDS disability, reflective practice, co-Ability, knowing-inaction.